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CLASSIC COCKTAILS AND DRINKS

Below you will find recipes for some standard, classic  —  and not-so-classic  —  cocktails and other drinks.

Bellini
Campari and Orange
Death in the Afternoon
Gibson
Gin and Tonic
Kir Imperial
Kir Royal
Maraschino Punch
Pisco Sour
Screwdriver
Sidecar
Singapore Sling
Snowball  —  Lumipallo
Strega
Vesper
Vodka Martini
White Russian  —  short
White Russian  —  long

Symbols:
Long drink = Long drink Short drink = Short drink Sweet drink = Sweet drink
Hot drink = Hot drink Punch = Punch

See recipes for Bloody Mary, Brandy Alexander, Grasshopper, Irish coffee, Margarita and non-alcoholic Kir Finlandais, or instructions for enjoying absinthe, raki or sake.


BELLINI Long drink

Bellini The Bellini cocktail is said to have been invented in "Harry's Bar" in Venice, Italy.

champagne or sparkling wine (traditionally Prosecco)
ripe, sweet white peaches
(sugar)

Peel the peaches (by blanching them, if necessary) and puree the flesh thoroughly (or use a top-quality frozen peach puree, if white peaches are not available). Sweeten the puree with sugar, if necessary.

Place one to two tablespoons of peach puree in a champagne flute. Half-fill the glass with champagne or sparkling wine and mix gently. Wait until the frothing stops, top up with champagne and serve.

For a larger crowd, use a whole bottle (750 ml) of champagne/sparkling wine and three to four peaches. Gently mix the peach puree and champagne in a bowl or jug before pouring or decanting into glasses. This amount will serve four persons.

Recipe source: Jackson, M. (1979) Michael Jackson's Pocket Bar Book. London: Mitchell Beazley Publishers Limited, and traditional recipes.


CAMPARI AND ORANGE Long drink

Campari and orange "Campari and Orange" is usually made with about one part Campari to three parts of orange juice, but I prefer the drink with a smaller amount of Campari, giving the sweet juice just a tinge of bitterness.

The relatively low alcohol content makes Campari and Orange a perfect refreshment to be enjoyed on a hot summer afternoon.

2 cl Campari
150 - 200 ml freshly squeezed juice from sweet oranges
ice cubes
(orange slice)

Using the sweetest oranges you can find really makes a big difference to the flavour of this drink, as does using freshly squeezed, not boxed or canned, juice.

Strain the orange juice. Fill a large glass with ice cubes. Pour the Campari in the glass and top with the orange juice. Garnish with an orange slice and serve, preferably while lazing around on a sunny patio.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: adapted from traditional recipe.


DEATH IN THE AFTERNOON Long drink

Death in the Afternoon Named after Ernest Hemingway's book, this cocktail is also known simply as "Hemingway", invented by the writer himself and included in a 1935 book of celebrity cocktail recipes ("So Red The Nose or Breath In The Afternoon", edited by Sterling North and Carl Kroch).

1½ - 2 tbsp genuine, good-quality absinthe
chilled champagne

The assembling of the cocktail is best told in Hemingway's own words, although I'm not so sure it would be good to follow his advice of "drinking three or five of these slowly":

"Pour one jigger absinthe into a champagne glass. Add iced champagne until it attains the proper opalescent milkiness."

Serves 1.

Recipe source: adapted from "Hemingway", Jackson, M. (1979) Michael Jackson's Pocket Bar Book. London: Mitchell Beazley Publishers Limited.



GIBSON Short drink

Gibson 3 cl Tanqueray gin (or Gordon's, Beefeater, etc)
1 tsp Martini Extra Dry Vermouth
(dash of orange bitters)
freshly cut strip of orange or lemon rind
2 pickled pearl onions

Pour the gin and vermouth (and orange bitters, if using any) in a mixing glass over ice and stir for a maximum of 30 seconds. Strain into a chilled cocktail or martini glass.

Hold the strip of orange or lemon rind over the drink with the coloured skin-side down and twist it so that a light mist of essential oil is sprayed from the peel on the surface of the drink. Discard the peel.

Decorate the cocktail with two pearl onions on a cocktail stick and serve as an aperitif.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: adapted from traditional recipes.


GIN AND TONIC Long drink

Gin and Tonic Bombay Sapphire gin lends some lovely fruity and floral notes to this otherwise dullest of drinks.

3 cl Bombay Sapphire gin
chilled Schweppes Indian Tonic Water to taste
ice cubes
½ slice or a wedge of lime or lemon

Pour the gin over some ice cubes in a tallish glass. Top with tonic from a freshly opened can/bottle.

Squeeze a few drops of lime or lemon juice in the glass and stir. Drop in the citrus slice or wedge and serve.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: adapted from traditional recipes.



Bellini KIR IMPERIAL Long drink

Chambord is a French-produced top-quality, aromatic liqueur made with various types of raspberries (red raspberries, blackberries, black raspberries, etc), blackcurrants, cognac and flavourings (eg vanilla, hibiscus, herbs).

1 - 2 tbsp Chambord liqueur
chilled champagne or sparkling wine (
eg Moët & Chandon Impérial)

Pour the liqueur in a champagne flute and top with champagne or sparkling wine. Serve as an aperitif.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: traditional recipe.



Kir Royal KIR ROYAL Long drink

2 tsp - 2 tbsp Crème de cassis de Dijon (blackcurrant liqueur)
chilled champagne or sparkling wine (
eg Moët & Chandon Impérial)

Pour the liqueur in a champagne flute and top with champagne or sparkling wine. Serve as an aperitif.
Serves 1.

Kir Royal becomes Kir Imperial when raspberry liqueur is used instead of blackcurrant liqueur (see the previous recipe above).

See a recipe for a non-alcoholic Finnish version of Kir, Kir Finlandais.

Recipe source: traditional recipe.



Maraschino punch MARASCHINO PUNCH Hot drink

Here is a "literary" drink recipe, a hot tea and Maraschino punch featured in the mystery novel "The Haunted Hotel" by Wilkie Collins (1824 - 1889).

Maraschino liqueur is an Italian distillate of marasca sour cherries.

2 - 3 cl Luxardo Maraschino liqueur
hot black tea
(sugar)

Pour the liqueur in tea glass or other heat-proof glass. Top with freshly brewed hot tea.

Sweeten with sugar, if you like, and serve.
Serves 1.

Luxardo Maraschino In picture on right: a bottle of Maraschino Originale by the Italian liqueur factory Girolamo Luxardo S.p.A.

An extract from Wilkie Collins's short novel "The Haunted Hotel" (1878):

He [Francis Westwick] found a quiet corner in which they could take their places without attracting notice. "What will you have?" he inquired resignedly. She [Countess Narona] gave her own orders to the waiter, without troubling him to speak for her.

"Maraschino. And a pot of tea."

The waiter stared; Francis stared. The tea was a novelty (in connection with maraschino) to both of them. Careless whether she surprised them or not, she instructed the waiter, when her directions had been complied with, to pour a large wineglassfull of the liqueur into a tumbler, and to fill it up from the teapot. "I can't do it for myself," she remarked, "my hand trembles so."

She drank the strange mixture eagerly, hot as it was. "Maraschino punch - will you taste some of it?" she said. "I inherit the discovery of this drink. When your English Queen Caroline was on the Continent, my mother was attached to her Court. That much-injured Royal Person invented, in her happier hours, maraschino punch. Fondly attached to her gracious mistress, my mother shared her tastes. And I, in my turn, learnt from my mother."

Recipe source: adapted from a beverage featured in the short novel "The Haunted Hotel  —  A Mystery of Modern Venice" (1878), Collins, W. (2006) The Haunted Hotel and Other Strange Tales. Ware: Wordsworth Editions Limited.


PISCO SOUR Long drink

Pisco Sour Note that Finnish eggs are among the safest in the world to be eaten uncooked. To find out why, read here.

Pisco is a type of grape brandy popular in South America, especially in Peru and Chile, who are both producers of it and claim it as their native drink.

Pisco Sour cocktail, based on the similar Pisco Punch cocktail allegedly dating from the late 19th century California, U.S.A., has in 21st century been established as a cocktail list staple in many of the "hippest" bars and nightclubs of various European capitals.

Pisco Sour has also proven popular among some enthusiastic readers of Alastair Reynolds's science fiction novels, in which the drink is frequently mentioned.

6 cl good-quality Peruvian (or Chilean) Pisco brandy (eg Soldeica)
2 cl freshly squeezed lime juice
2 cl sugar syrup
1 fresh, small egg white (about 3 - 4 cl)
Pisco Supreme Blend Soldeica dash of Angostura bitters
icing sugar
ice cubes
(lime wedge)

Sift a layer of icing sugar on a shallow plate. Take a low tumbler or sour glass, turn it upside down and dampen its rim by swirling it around the moist surface of a freshly cut lime (or lemon) half. Dip the glass in the sugar on the plate to create a thinly frosted rim. Set aside.

Strain the lime juice. Dry-shake the ingredients: pour the Pisco, lime juice, sugar syrup and egg white in an empty cocktail shaker. Shake the ingredients for about 10 to 15 seconds, then add ice cubes and shake again until well-chilled. (Dry-shaking supposedly gives the drink a nicer "top".)

Strain the liquid in the prepared glass. There should be a layer of froth from the egg white on top. Shake a couple of drops of Angostura bitters on the frothy surface and serve (garnished with lime wedge, if required).
Serves 1.

In picture on right: a bottle of Peruvian Pisco brand "Soldeica".

Recipe source: adapted from traditional recipes.


Screwdriver SCREWDRIVER Long drink

2 - 3 cl vodka (Stolichnaya, Russian Standard, Belvedere or Finlandia)
freshly squeezed orange juice to taste
ice cubes
(orange slice or a twist of orange peel)

Strain the orange juice. Pour the vodka in a tall glass half-filled with ice.

Top with orange juice, stir (decorate with orange slice or peel) and serve.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: traditional recipe.



SIDECAR Short drink

Sidecar 2 cl cognac, brandy or armagnac
2 cl Cointreau
2 cl freshly squeezed lemon juice
twist of lemon peel
sugar

Pour a layer of caster sugar on a shallow plate. Take a cocktail glass and holding it by its stem, turn it upside down and dampen its rim by swirling it around the moist surface of a freshly cut lemon half.

Dip the glass in the sugar on the plate to create a thinly frosted rim. Set aside. (The sugar frosting may be omitted.)

Strain the lemon juice. Fill a cocktail shaker with ice up to ¾. Pour the cognac, Cointreau and lemon juice over the ice, shake and strain in the cocktail glass. Decorate with the lemon peel and serve as an aperitif.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: traditional recipe.


SINGAPORE SLING Long drink Sweet drink

Singapore Sling

30 ml (2 tbsp) Tanqueray gin
15 ml (1 tbsp) Heering cherry liqueur
10 ml (2 tsp) Cointreau
10 ml (2 tsp) DOM Bénédictine liqueur
10 ml (2 tsp) Monin grenadine
15 ml (1 tbsp) freshly squeezed lime juice
120 ml pineapple juice
dash of Angostura bitters
for garnish:
fresh pineapple slice
Maraschino cherry

Preferably use a tall and narrowish, short-stemmed glass for serving this cocktail.

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice up to ¾. Fill the glass at least half full with crushed ice or ice cubes. Pour all the ingredients in the shaker over the ice, shake and strain into the glass.

Decorate with a pineapple slice/wedge and a Maraschino cherry. Serve with a straw.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: adapted from traditional recipe.


Snowball SNOWBALL Short drink Sweet drink
Lumipallo

There are many different cocktails and drinks sharing this name. This version is a sweet Finnish cocktail (lumipallo means "snowball" in Finnish) using arctic bramble (Rubus arcticus) liqueur, a Nordic speciality. It can be substituted with lingonberry or cranberry liqueur.

2 cl vodka (Stolichnaya, Russian Standard, Belvedere or Finlandia)
2 - 3 cl arctic bramble liqueur
2 cl cream

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice up to ¾. Pour the vodka, liqueur and cream over the ice, shake and strain in a chilled cocktail glass. Serve as an after dinner cocktail.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: label on unknown Finnish liqueur producer's arctic bramble liqueur bottle, mid-1980s.


Strega liqueur STREGA Short drink

Whenever drinking Strega, I am reminded of my grandmother who introduced me to it, often serving it with coffee.

The name of this bittersweet Italian herbal liqueur means "witch" in Italian  —  perfect for female tête-à-tête moments :-)

Liquore Strega

Serve Strega at room temperature (or chilled, if you like) in small glasses as a digestif or a refreshing pick-me-up in the afternoon with strong espresso coffee.

Besides used in cocktails, Strega is also added to many Italian dishes, especially desserts, and it can be served with ice creams and fruit.

There are some myths and legends connected with Strega, one regarding two lovers drinking it together, as stated in the dialogue between Wyn Strafford (Dennis Morgan) and Kitty Foyle (Ginger Rogers), characters in the film "Kitty Foyle" (1940) (pictured below):


Kitty Foyle
Kitty Foyle: "What's 'Strega'?"
Wyn Strafford: "Oh, it's an Italian liqueur. There's a picture of a witch on the bottle.
They say that if two people drink it together, they'll never drink it apart."

Recipe source: traditional "recipe".


VESPER Short drink

Vesper This is a contemporary version of the cocktail Vesper which regained popularity after it was seen sipped on the silver screen by the secret agent James Bond in the 2006 film remake of Ian Fleming's novel "Casino Royale".

In picture on right: a perfect Vesper served at "The Bar" of The Merchant Hotel in Belfast, Northern Ireland.

The formerly quinine-flavoured, colourless Kina Lillet aperitif wine used in the original recipe has since been reformulated and named as "Lillet Blanc". The "modern" Lillet has a pleasant, non-bitter, sweetish floral flavour and is perfect to be enjoyed chilled on its own or with some ice as a refreshing, low-alcohol aperitif.

Using it in this recipe, especially in such a large, unorthodox amount as I have done, makes a very different-tasting cocktail compared to the original. For a more "authentic" flavour, try replacing Lillet with ½ centilitre of Cocchi Americano, an Italian aperitif wine said to bear the closest resemblance to the original Kina Lillet. Another aperitif wine worth trying might be Kina l'Aero d'Or, produced by the family-owned Swiss spirits company Matter Spirits (Matter-Luginbühl AG).

Lillet Blanc

3 cl Tanqueray gin (or Gordon's gin)
1 cl Stolichnaya vodka
2 cl Lillet Blanc (or ½ cl Cocchi Americano or Kina l'Aero d'Or)
large, thin slice of lemon peel

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice up to ¾. Pour the gin, vodka and Lillet over the ice, shake and strain in a chilled cocktail glass (or champagne goblet). Drop the lemon peel slice in the glass and serve.
Serves 1.

In picture on right: a bottle of modern-day Lillet Blanc.

James Bond's original instructions for the drink from Ian Fleming's "Casino Royale" (1953):

[James] Bond insisted on ordering [Felix] Leiter's Haig-and-Haig 'on the rocks' and then he looked carefully at the barman.

"A dry martini," he said. "One. In a deep champagne goblet."

"Oui, monsieur."

"Just a moment. Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon-peel. Got it?"

"Certainly, monsieur." The barman seemed pleased with the idea.

"Gosh, that's certainly a drink," said Leiter.

Bond laughed. "When I'm... er... concentrating," he explained, "I never have more than one drink before dinner. But I do like that one to be large and very strong and very cold and very well-made. I hate small portions of anything, particularly when they taste bad. This drink's my own invention. I'm going to patent it when I can think of a good name."

He watched carefully as the deep glass became frosted with the pale golden drink, slightly aerated by the bruising of the shaker. He reached for it and took a long sip.

"Excellent," he said to the barman, "but if you can get a vodka made with grain instead of potatoes, you will find it still better."
"Mais n'enculons pas des mouches," he added in an aside to the barman. The barman grinned.

:
:
:

"I think it's a fine name," said Bond. An idea struck him. "Can I borrow it?" He explained about the special martini he had invented and his search for a name for it. "The Vesper," he said. "It sounds perfect and it's very appropriate to the violet hour when my cocktail will now be drunk all over the world. Can I have it?"

"So long as I can try one first," she [Vesper Lynd] promised. "It sounds a drink to be proud of." *

* Can someone really endure reading this kind of cr*p? :-D

Recipe source: adapted from traditional and contemporary recipes.


Vodka Martini VODKA MARTINI Short drink

This unpretentious cocktail is sometimes called "Vodkatini".

3 tbsp vodka (Stolichnaya, Russian Standard, Belvedere or Finlandia)
1 tbsp Martini Extra Dry Vermouth
1 plain, unstuffed green olive (or a twist of lemon peel)

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice up to ¾. Pour the vodka and vermouth over the ice, shake and strain in a chilled cocktail glass. Decorate the cocktail with an olive on a cocktail stick and serve as an aperitif.

If lemon peel is used as garnish instead of the olive, this cocktail is apparently known as "Kangaroo".
Serves 1.

Recipe source: adapted from traditional recipes.


WHITE RUSSIAN Short drink Sweet drink
Short

Short White Russian There are many methods for preparing the White Russian cocktail. The liqueur and spirit may be shaken with ice, strained into an ice-filled glass, with the cream, which can be thickened slightly by beating or shaking it, floated on top. The liqueur and spirit may also be stirred in ice-filled glass and topped with the cream.

All the ingredients may also be shaken with ice, which is the method described below.

2 cl Kahlúa
2 cl vodka (Stolichnaya, Russian Standard, Belvedere or Finlandia)
2 cl cream or light cream

Fill a cocktail shaker with ice up to ¾. Pour the Kahlúa, vodka and cream over the ice, shake and strain into a cocktail glass.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: adapted from traditional recipes.


WHITE RUSSIAN Long drink Sweet drink
Long

Long White Russian This long, milky version of White Russian (see above) is nowadays known by many as the favourite drink of Jeff "The Dude" Lebowski, the main character played by Jeff Bridges in the 1998 film "The Big Lebowski", but it has also been a favourite, like many other sweet, milk-based alcoholic drinks, among the youngsters partying in Finnish clubs and bars for at least a couple of decades.

2 cl Kahlúa
2 cl vodka (Stolichnaya, Russian Standard, Belvedere or Finlandia)
milk (or half-and-half)

Place a few ice cubes in a tall glass. Fill a cocktail shaker with ice up to ¾. Pour the Kahlúa and vodka over the ice, shake and strain in the glass over the ice cubes. Top up with ice-cold milk, stir and serve with a straw.

You can also shake all the ingredients with ice and strain into the glass, or just stir them in the glass with the ice.
Serves 1.

Recipe source: adapted from traditional recipes.


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