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GRILLED SALMON STEAKS

Grilled butterfly fillet of salmon Salmon is a popular ingredient in Finnish summertime cooking.

It can be grilled, fried, baked or smoked, or used in soups or in making of gravlax or sushi.

Instead of grilling, this dish can be made by simply cooking the salmon in a frying pan or a stovetop grill pan.

pieces cut from salmon fillet, thick salmon steaks or butterfly fillets  —  one per diner
salt
lemon juice
chopped fresh dill

Salmon steaks are crosswise cuts from a whole, cleaned fish. They include a piece of the backbone.

Butterfly fillets of salmon Butterfly fillets are cut from a fish fillet. Cut the unskinned, thick fillet crosswise in about three to four centimetre wide slices. Then halve each slice lengthwise by making a cut down to the skin, not piercing the skin. Then turn the sides outwards, so that the piece "opens" from the middle like a book, forming a medallion-shaped, oval steak (see the picture on right).

You can buy the salmon steaks, butterfly fillets or fillet pieces readily cut from your fishmonger. If you buy a whole, unskinned fillet, you can cut your own butterfly fillets or cut the fillet crosswise in suitable serving sized pieces (like the piece in the picture below). Do not remove the skin.

Salmon, new potatoes and radish salad If grilling the fish on a charcoal barbecue, gas grill etc, use low heat, letting the fish pieces cook slowly. The fish is done, but still juicy, when it is starting to turn opaque around the edges.

Cooking time depends on the thickness of the fish pieces. Do not let the fish become overdone and dry, it is better to let it be slightly underdone.

Drizzle the steaks with a dash of fresh lemon juice and sprinkle with salt and dill. Serve immediately with cooked new potatoes, radish and green onion salad, pickled herring and a dollop of smetana, créme fraîche or sour cream.

Recipe source: family recipe/traditional Finnish recipe.


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